DANGEROUS DAYS

D-Days (V) Culture/Commerce

PREDICTIONS FROM "BLADE RUNNER" 1982
A STATUS QUO REPORT

Blade Runner | Dangerous Days 05 | Oliver Lins - Japanese OOH advertising - Osaka
Blade Runner | Dangerous Days 05 | Oliver Lins - Japanese OOH Neon advertising signage - Osaka
Blade Runner | Dangerous Days 05 | Oliver Lins - Japanese OOH Neon advertising signage - Osaka Dotonbori
Blade Runner | Dangerous Days 05 | Oliver Lins - Japanese OOH advertising
Blade Runner | Dangerous Days 05 | Oliver Lins - Japanese OOH advertising - Osaka Neon & LED mega billboards - Dotonbori
Blade Runner | Dangerous Days 05 | Oliver Lins - Japanese OOH advertising - Osaka Neon Hotel Casa De Francia
Blade Runner | Dangerous Days 05 | Oliver Lins - Japanese OOH advertising - Osaka Dotonbori Neon & LED Mega Billboards
Blade Runner | Dangerous Days 05 | Oliver Lins - Japanese OOH Neon & LED advertising - Osaka
Blade Runner | Dangerous Days 05 | Oliver Lins - Japanese OOH advertising - Osaka Dotonbori Neon & LED Mega Billboards

Dangerous Days part 05 focuses on the cultural and commercial ties our societies are entangled in and the effects of advertising practices, the individual is exposed to in today’s world and cities in particular. So-called “OOH (Out of home)” ads are of special interest as they have to be consumed to their full extent and involuntarily, offering no option to escape. OOH ads include anything from gigantic, large scale digital screens or neon signs covering whole buildings, to wall murals, sculptures, billboards, uni-poles, public transportation and infrastructure ads, video monitors and brightly lit updates to the classic advertising pillar (the “Litfaßsäule”), signs and display windows as well as the printed poster in all its formats.

Special thanks and much love to Korean-American producer Jamaica Suk, who turned out the marvelous “Commerce-Mix”, a truly dark and thriving force which takes you for a ride. Built on my audio filed recordings.

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One of the more memorable visuals from the original 1982 motion picture is the enormous Outdoor Digital Billboard displaying a Japanese Geisha. This visual loops through footage of her swallowing a pill, advertising birth control to a mass audience. While the advert itself is considered to be a parody of an existing Japanese product (Strong Wakamoto), one thing is evident and that’s the precision with which our advertising reality has been envisioned. Not surprising considering Ridley Scott came from an advertising background but remarkable nevertheless! In principle though the purpose and function of billboard ads hasn’t changed since the first 24-sheet board was erected at the Paris Exposition in 1889. Simply put, it remains a format with high visual impact that can’t be turned off or avoided, providing maximum reach to a huge number of spectators.

Part 01 | World/Off-World Part 02 | Man/Machine Part 03 | Structure/Network Part 04 | Architecture/Space

Blade Runner | Dangerous Days 05 | Oliver Lins - Japanese OOH advertising - Osaka Restaurant
Blade Runner | Dangerous Days 05 | Oliver Lins - Japanese OOH advertising - Noodle shop storefront
Blade Runner | Dangerous Days 05 | Oliver Lins - Japanese OOH advertising - Osaka Neon Dotonbori
Blade Runner | Dangerous Days 05 | Oliver Lins - Japanese OOH advertising - Osaka Restaurant
Blade Runner | Dangerous Days 05 | Oliver Lins - Japanese OOH advertising - Neon signage Chinese Restaurant Yokohama
Blade Runner | Dangerous Days 05 | Oliver Lins - Japanese OOH advertising - Osaka Dotonbori
Blade Runner | Dangerous Days 05 | Oliver Lins - Japanese OOH advertising - Osaka
Blade Runner | Dangerous Days 05 | Oliver Lins - Japanese OOH traditional advertising - Osaka Dotonbori
Blade Runner | Dangerous Days 05 | Oliver Lins - Japanese OOH advertising - Osaka
Blade Runner | Dangerous Days 05 | Oliver Lins - Japanese OOH traditional advertising - Osaka Dotonbori
Blade Runner | Dangerous Days 05 | Oliver Lins - Japanese OOH advertising - Osaka
Blade Runner | Dangerous Days 05 | Oliver Lins - Japanese OOH advertising - Osaka restaurant
Blade Runner | Dangerous Days 05 | Oliver Lins - Japanese OOH advertising - Osaka
Blade Runner | Dangerous Days 05 | Oliver Lins - Japanese OOH advertising - Osaka
Blade Runner | Dangerous Days 05 | Oliver Lins - Japanese OOH advertising - Osaka
Blade Runner | Dangerous Days 05 | Oliver Lins Japanese Restaurant Menu Poster
Blade Runner | Dangerous Days 05 | Oliver Lins - Japanese OOH advertising - Restaurant entrance
Blade Runner | Dangerous Days 05 | Oliver Lins - Japanese OOH advertising - Restaurant simple setup
Blade Runner | Dangerous Days 05 | Oliver Lins - Japanese OOH advertising - Restaurant waiter monja
Blade Runner | Dangerous Days 05 | Oliver Lins - Japanese OOH advertising Tokyo Yodobashi
Blade Runner | Dangerous Days 05 | Oliver Lins - Japanese OOH advertising Tokyo Yodobashi
Blade Runner | Dangerous Days 05 | Oliver Lins - Japanese OOH advertising - Yodobashi storefront signage
Blade Runner | Dangerous Days 05 | Oliver Lins - Japanese OOH advertising - Shopping - Neon Yodobashi storefront
Blade Runner | Dangerous Days 05 | Oliver Lins - Japanese OOH advertising - Yodobashi storefront neon signage
Blade Runner | Dangerous Days 05 | Oliver Lins - Japanese OOH advertising Tokyo Yodobashi

Significant cultural differences become apparent once you first set foot in a Japanese city where you’re bombarded by the brightest of lights and impressed by the strongest of billboard structures, uni-poles and a flood of posters galore, leaving you amazed about the sheer volume and intensity of it all. It’s unlike anything you’d find in the West. It’s an onslaught on the senses. Entire buildings are covered with a myriad of signs, and yet in all this overwhelming clutter it becomes clear that other culturally rooted ad strategies, audience perceptions and aesthetics are at work. As a graphics person and photographer who has a thing for signs, the first thought that popped was “how do you fit that much sign onto a single building?” A puzzle which solved itself quickly. It’s the vertical orientation of traditional Japanese writing, allowing a building owner to take full advantage of the vertical axis and facade real-estate. On top of that the Western, mostly English alphabet, co-exists alongside the Japanese ones of which there are three. As a result literally every square inch is utilized. But what can’t be deciphered, is not understood and a frequent issue for most visitors and tourists. I on the other hand love the saturation and mix of styles, designs, typefaces, languages and epochs. It’s enjoyable to look at signs and billboards which I can’t read or understand yet.

Blade Runner | Dangerous Days 05 | Oliver Lins - Japanese OOH advertising - Signage
Blade Runner | Dangerous Days 05 | Oliver Lins - Japanese OOH advertising - Underpass poster painted billboard ads
Blade Runner | Dangerous Days 05 | Oliver Lins - Japanese OOH advertising - Tsukumo
Blade Runner | Dangerous Days 05 | Oliver Lins - Japanese OOH advertising - Retail shop display window
Blade Runner | Dangerous Days 05 | Oliver Lins - Japanese OOH advertising - 747
Blade Runner | Dangerous Days 05 | Oliver Lins - Japanese OOH advertising - Retail shop display window
Blade Runner | Dangerous Days 05 | Oliver Lins - Japanese OOH advertising - Tokyo Anime Akihabara
Blade Runner | Dangerous Days 05 | Oliver Lins - Japanese OOH advertising Tokyo
Blade Runner | Dangerous Days 05 | Oliver Lins - Japanese OOH advertising
Blade Runner | Dangerous Days 05 | Oliver Lins - Japanese OOH advertising - Tax Free Shopping
Blade Runner | Dangerous Days 05 | Oliver Lins - Japanese OOH advertising - Osaka storefront
Blade Runner | Dangerous Days 05 | Oliver Lins - Japanese OOH advertising - Living lit up sign
Blade Runner | Dangerous Days 05 | Oliver Lins - Japanese OOH advertising - Osaka storefront anime
Blade Runner | Dangerous Days 05 | Oliver Lins - Japanese OOH advertising - City by night
Blade Runner | Dangerous Days 05 | Oliver Lins - Japanese OOH advertising - Roppongi Roppongi
Blade Runner | Dangerous Days 05 | Oliver Lins - Japanese OOH advertising - Restaurant signage waving cat
Blade Runner | Dangerous Days 05 | Oliver Lins - Japanese OOH advertising - city by night

Sooner or later I’ll find out anyway, having the power of the global nervous system right in my pocket. Setting a step back to halt for a moment and take in this new sensation, I thought about how we got here in the first place. The westernization of Japan began during the Meiji era (1868 – 1912) and saw a rapid development in printing tech and the media. The appearance of newspapers and magazines propelled the outset of advertising agencies and campaigns. During this time the country underwent a dramatic transformation and western culture was prevalent everywhere and brought about western styles and ways of life. This is still happening today but now works both ways. Proof and traces of this ongoing East-West affair can still be found and show how some practices merged and developed and others did not. It’s the presence of those materialized witnesses from the past, mingling with the contemporary and the new throughout today’s cityscapes, which I find to be so immensely valuable and interesting. Some old, worn-out signs are merely still around because the owning company vanished and no-one wants to pay for the removal. Yet others are cherished and maintained despite their horrific maintenance cost because there is much more to it than just the nostalgic value. Undoubtedly the light and colors which classic neon radiates and the feelings they cause, are very particular and appreciated by many.

Blade Runner | Dangerous Days 05 | Oliver Lins - Japanese OOH advertising - Akihabara
Blade Runner | Dangerous Days 05 | Oliver Lins - Japanese OOH advertising
Blade Runner | Dangerous Days 05 | Oliver Lins - Japanese OOH advertising - Fuji Xerox
Blade Runner | Dangerous Days 05 | Oliver Lins - Japanese OOH advertising - Neon billboards
Blade Runner | Dangerous Days 05 | Oliver Lins - Japanese OOH advertising - Tokyo Akihabara
Blade Runner | Dangerous Days 05 | Oliver Lins - Japanese OOH advertising - Akihabara Anime
Blade Runner | Dangerous Days 05 | Oliver Lins - Japanese OOH advertising - Akihabara
Blade Runner | Dangerous Days 05 | Oliver Lins - Japanese OOH advertising - Double exposure
Blade Runner | Dangerous Days 05 | Oliver Lins - Japanese shopping - Double exposure
Blade Runner | Dangerous Days 05 | Oliver Lins - Japanese OOH advertising - Double exposure
Blade Runner | Dangerous Days 05 | Oliver Lins - Japanese shopping - Big Box Neon Tokyo
Blade Runner | Dangerous Days 05 | Oliver Lins - Japanese OOH advertising
Blade Runner | Dangerous Days 05 | Oliver Lins - Japanese OOH advertising - Akihabara Pac Man Gaming Hub
Blade Runner | Dangerous Days 05 | Oliver Lins - Japanese OOH advertising - Tokyo Akihabara
Blade Runner | Dangerous Days 05 | Oliver Lins - Japanese OOH advertising - Akihabara
Blade Runner | Dangerous Days 05 | Oliver Lins - Japanese OOH advertising - Tokyo Akihabara
Blade Runner | Dangerous Days 05 | Oliver Lins - Japanese OOH advertising - Akihabara

Today the decay and systematic deconstruction of these unique objects can be witnessed everywhere. Some hold against this development with pioneering ideas, such as the Buchstabenmuseum in Berlin or the Neon Museum in Vegas, collecting and exhibiting their rare and priceless findings. Look at Hong-Kong which was until just recently known as the neon capital of the world. Light-emitting diodes (LED) have been taking over and quite frankly, the takeover has so far not been pretty. New technologies such as the 12V replacement tubes, capable of emitting a glow equal to their high voltage predecessors are very promising and could save the neon aesthetics. “LED Neon” which is not my thing, has been given a chance but remains a topic of frequent and heated discussions. Mostly lopsided they are, forgetting the other essential ingredient every great sign requires: Quality content as well as design. Advancing in time does not equal advancing in design and style. Eras have varying goals which of course contribute to the outcome. If transiency, cost and an aggressive and fast target group approach are the primary goals, others will have to make way. A neon-classic which crowned a skyline for decades and was perceived as a symbol of stability and trust and even became part of a neighborhood’s identity, can now suddenly turn into a “lightmare” (as I like to call it), harassing the bypassing and locals every split second they catch a glimpse of the new, loud, erratic and extremely bright screens.

Blade Runner | Dangerous Days 05 | Oliver Lins - Japanese OOH advertising -Yokohama Neon Signage
Blade Runner | Dangerous Days 05 | Oliver Lins - Japanese OOH advertising - Red light district signage
Blade Runner | Dangerous Days 05 | Oliver Lins - Japanese manga OOH advertising
Blade Runner | Dangerous Days 05 | Oliver Lins - Japanese OOH advertising - Tokyo Akihabara
Blade Runner | Dangerous Days 05 | Oliver Lins - Japanese OOH advertising - Tokyo Akihabara
Blade Runner | Dangerous Days 05 | Oliver Lins - Japanese OOH advertising
Blade Runner | Dangerous Days 05 | Oliver Lins - Japanese OOH advertising - Akihabara
Blade Runner | Dangerous Days 05 | Oliver Lins - Japanese OOH advertising signage
Blade Runner | Dangerous Days 05 | Oliver Lins - Japanese signage OOH advertising
Blade Runner | Dangerous Days 05 | Oliver Lins - Japanese OOH advertising - Signage Standing bar
Blade Runner | Dangerous Days 05 | Oliver Lins - Japanese OOH advertising - Tokyo Akihabara
Blade Runner | Dangerous Days 05 | Oliver Lins - Japanese OOH advertising - Neon billboards Panasonic Onoden Akihabara
Blade Runner | Dangerous Days 05 | Oliver Lins - Japanese OOH advertising - Curry Restaurant
Blade Runner | Dangerous Days 05 | Oliver Lins - Japanese OOH advertising - Tokyo neon by night
Blade Runner | Dangerous Days 05 | Oliver Lins - Japanese OOH advertising - Curry Restaurant

The current global “trend” of increased levels of aggression infiltrating all aspects of life is besides politics, also particularly evident in advertising. It’s not about convincing anymore, it’s about threatening and causing fear. We are now entering the era of “DOOH (digital out of home)” advertising and whether that’s a step up or not, is for you to decide. Though still just a “sign of our times”, these new and highly advanced devices and screens incorporate digital on a level you are familiar with already: personalized content. So what the digital nature of DOOH media means for you in particular, is that its output exists only in the “here and now” and is not orchestrated beforehand but feeds off data, big data that is. By merging it with social media and, by linking it live with various types of personal devices on location, DOOH aims at creating an experience which is tailored just for you and appears only when you are present. This is far scarier than your average browser ad which you can easily get rid of. The rapid changes of our time in which culture drives consumption, lead to conflicts between cultural traditions and new ways of life and business practices. Career advancers, often single, spend more time in the office and travel a lot, having less time for themselves and/or their families. It’s the lack of time which changes everything from eating habits to family orientation, the way of communicating, to consumer behavior and advertising practices.

Blade Runner | Dangerous Days 05 | Oliver Lins - Japanese signage Ginza, itoya
Blade Runner | Dangerous Days 05 | Oliver Lins - Ginza Tokyo OOH advertising
Blade Runner | Dangerous Days 05 | Oliver Lins - Japanese OOH advertising Neon
Blade Runner | Dangerous Days 05 | Oliver Lins - Japanese OOH advertising from Taxi
Blade Runner | Dangerous Days 05 | Oliver Lins - Japanese OOH advertising - Ginza Chaumet storefront signage
Blade Runner | Dangerous Days 05 | Oliver Lins - Japanese OOH advertising - Ginza Giorgio storefront signage
Blade Runner | Dangerous Days 05 | Oliver Lins - Japanese OOH advertising - Ginza Ermenegildo Zegna
Blade Runner | Dangerous Days 05 | Oliver Lins - Japanese OOH advertising - Ginza Chanel storefront signage
Blade Runner | Dangerous Days 05 | Oliver Lins - Japanese OOH advertising - Morimura Brothers USA
Blade Runner | Dangerous Days 05 | Oliver Lins - Japanese OOH advertising - Coca Cola - Drink from fountains
Blade Runner | Dangerous Days 05 | Oliver Lins - Japanese OOH advertising - Tokyo Ginza - Signage Dunhill London
Blade Runner | Dangerous Days 05 | Oliver Lins - Japanese OOH advertising - Ginza Cartier logo signage staff at work
Blade Runner | Dangerous Days 05 | Oliver Lins - Japanese Mori Museum Fine Art light sculpture
Blade Runner | Dangerous Days 05 | Oliver Lins - Japanese OOH advertising - Tokyo Shibuya UC neon billboard
Blade Runner | Dangerous Days 05 | Oliver Lins - Japanese OOH advertising - Shibuya UC Neon classic
Blade Runner | Dangerous Days 05 | Oliver Lins - Japanese OOH advertising - Shibuya UC Neon classic

In many international markets, foreign influences, industrialization and massive urbanization attempts are turning even ancient traditions upside down. Words like free time and vacation are used sparsely in the land of the rising sun. The Japanese work very long hours and that constantly. There can be no question: culture is and remains a decisive factor of consumer and human behaviour in general. Beyond the flurry of billboards, posters and other forms of outdoor advertising with the images of Japanese celebrities and visuals rooted in Japan’s historical and cultural heritage (from women dressed in kimonos to theatrical scenes), one thing is rather striking: the influence of manga and anime on outdoor advertising. Japanese black and white comics (Manga) and Japanese animation (Anime) are very popular and have succeeded in winning over audiences of all ages throughout the world. Today even France and the US have strong fan bases. Many of us raised in the 1980s and 1990s watched dubbed anime series on TV, probably not realizing they were originally Japanese. No wonder that the distinctive illustration and animation style is very prominent in Japanese advertising. Looking at the history helps to get a grip on the topic and understand the fascination with the style.

Blade Runner | Dangerous Days 05 | Oliver Lins - Japanese OOH advertising - Tokyo Tower Asakusa view
Blade Runner | Dangerous Days 05 | Oliver Lins - Japanese OOH advertising - Vintage Coca Cola billboard
Blade Runner | Dangerous Days 05 | Oliver Lins - Japanese OOH advertising - View from train
Blade Runner | Dangerous Days 05 | Oliver Lins - Japanese OOH advertising - Neon billboard
Blade Runner | Dangerous Days 05 | Oliver Lins - Japanese OOH advertising - Tokyo Asakusa
Blade Runner | Dangerous Days 05 | Oliver Lins - Japanese OOH advertising - Asakusa Traditional Mural
Blade Runner | Dangerous Days 05 | Oliver Lins - Japanese OOH advertising - Livina neon classic
Blade Runner | Dangerous Days 05 | Oliver Lins - Japanese OOH Neon advertising signage Leader Kikusui Iwatsu
Blade Runner | Dangerous Days 05 | Oliver Lins - Japanese billboards - OOH advertising
Blade Runner | Dangerous Days 05 | Oliver Lins - Japanese OOH advertising - Neon mega billboards
Blade Runner | Dangerous Days 05 | Oliver Lins - Japanese OOH advertising
Blade Runner | Dangerous Days 05 | Oliver Lins - Japanese OOH advertising Tokyo Robot Restaurant
Blade Runner | Dangerous Days 05 | Oliver Lins - Japanese OOH manga advertising
Blade Runner | Dangerous Days 05 | Oliver Lins - Japanese OOH manga advertising
Blade Runner | Dangerous Days 05 | Oliver Lins - Japanese OOH manga advertising
Blade Runner | Dangerous Days 05 | Oliver Lins - Japanese OOH advertising Tokyo Asakusa
Blade Runner | Dangerous Days 05 | Oliver Lins - Japanese OOH advertising - Shopping street with vendor
Blade Runner | Dangerous Days 05 | Oliver Lins - Japanese OOH advertising - Shopping street
Blade Runner | Dangerous Days 05 | Oliver Lins - Japanese OOH advertising - Akihabara
Blade Runner | Dangerous Days 05 | Oliver Lins - Japanese OOH advertising - Sex worker billboard
Blade Runner | Dangerous Days 05 | Oliver Lins - Japanese OOH advertising - Tokyo Shibuya Strip Club Neon
Blade Runner | Dangerous Days 05 | Oliver Lins - Japanese seafood restaurant crabs - Osaka
Blade Runner | Dangerous Days 05 | Oliver Lins - Japanese OOH advertising - Neon Classic
Blade Runner | Dangerous Days 05 | Oliver Lins - Japanese OOH advertising - Neon Classic
Blade Runner | Dangerous Days 05 | Oliver Lins - Japanese OOH advertising - Train station

Manga means ‘random pictures’ and the word was first used in the 19th century by a famous ukiyo-e artist (ukiyo-e are mass produced Japanese woodblock prints – 17th – 20th century). Storytelling illustrations were not novel in Japan. In fact ‘gi-ga’ (funny pictures) from the 12th century featured many manga traits already. The manga we know today emerged after WWII and is essentially the merger of ukiyo-e and western art. As there are practically no laws that limit what can appear in a manga, artists have total freedom. This is why manga can be very sexual, violent and can delve into any topic. While this is often the case, most Manga explores philosophical and existentialist questions and center on very real issues or just provide plain entertainment. Akihabara is a neighborhood in Tokyo, known to be the Manga, Anime and video game hot spot par excellence. Japan undoubtedly pioneered and led the video and computer gaming industry and development. It evolved when Manga and Anime techniques met with the sudden possibilities the newly established computer and electronics industry would provide. From Space Invaders, Donkey Kong, Pac-Man, Super-Mario and Final Fantasy to Legend of Zelda and Resident Evil, it was the Nintendo, Sega and Konami companies who set the ground rules.

Blade Runner | Dangerous Days 05 | Oliver Lins - Japanese OOH advertising Neon and painting
Blade Runner | Dangerous Days 05 | Oliver Lins - Japanese OOH advertising Neon Classic Clarion
Blade Runner | Dangerous Days 05 | Oliver Lins - Japanese manga OOH advertising
Blade Runner | Dangerous Days 05 | Oliver Lins - Japanese OOH advertising Neon Classic Asahi Super Dry
Blade Runner | Dangerous Days 05 | Oliver Lins - Japanese OOH advertising billboards
Blade Runner | Dangerous Days 05 | Oliver Lins - Japanese OOH advertising - Neon classic
Blade Runner | Dangerous Days 05 | Oliver Lins - Japanese OOH advertising signage Korea town Tokyo
Blade Runner | Dangerous Days 05 | Oliver Lins - Japanese OOH manga advertising
Blade Runner | Dangerous Days 05 | Oliver Lins - Japanese OOH advertising - Ramen restaurant entrance
Blade Runner | Dangerous Days 05 | Oliver Lins - Japanese Manga OOH advertising Tokyo
Blade Runner | Dangerous Days 05 | Oliver Lins - Japanese OOH advertising - Shopping - Facade billboards
Blade Runner | Dangerous Days 05 | Oliver Lins - Japanese ceiling mural Osaka - OOH advertising
Blade Runner | Dangerous Days 05 | Oliver Lins - Japanese OOH advertising Tokyo
Blade Runner | Dangerous Days 05 | Oliver Lins - Japanese OOH advertising Shibuya Tokyo
Blade Runner | Dangerous Days 05 | Oliver Lins - Japanese OOH advertising - Market
Blade Runner | Dangerous Days 05 | Oliver Lins - Japanese Manga OOH advertising Tokyo
Blade Runner | Dangerous Days 05 | Oliver Lins - Japanese Restaurant Puffer fish entrance sculpture
Blade Runner | Dangerous Days 05 | Oliver Lins - Japanese Restaurant chain Big Boy Dining unipoles OOH advertising
Blade Runner | Dangerous Days 05 | Oliver Lins - Japanese OOH advertising Shibuya Tokyo

As someone who is drawn to bright city lights like a moth, I wish for a brilliantly lit future indeed, but one that has regard for certain principles which should be common sense and which should operate within a sustainable “consumption framework”, since the current framework is a direct path to termination. It’s neither the act of trade, including all the steps required to exchange goods and services (dating back to our earliest days), nor is it the act of advertising a product which is malfunctioning. It’s the kind of products and services, the involved manufacturing processes and the methods of buying, selling, and advertising which matter. Low quality, cheaply produced, yet high priced products, slave workers enabling the disproportionately wealthy, shitty ads and idiot idols seen as respected leaders, equal a constant attack on anyone who believes in reason and progress, causing aggression on the consumption end, and even anxiety because escape is impossible. That’s where fair-trade enters the frame. And rip-off is a term which has gained momentum. More on this topic in the upcoming and final part “Outlook/Future”.

Part 01 | World/Off-World Part 02 | Man/Machine Part 03 | Structure/Network Part 04 | Architecture/Space Part 05 | Culture/Commerce

Blade Runner | Dangerous Days 05 | Oliver Lins - Japanese OOH advertising - Sapporo Draft Beer classic poster
Blade Runner | Dangerous Days 05 | Oliver Lins - Japanese Poster Classic Advertising

CREDITS

Concept, design, text, photos, audio field-recordings: Oliver Lins, Berlin (AT)
“Dangerous Days 05 | Commerce-Mix” by Jamaica Suk, Berlin (KR/US)

Soundcloud  YouTube

Thank you for your support.

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